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4 minutes ago, Devon Malcolm said:

Looking forward to watching this later. Melanie Laurent is great, and a really good director. Respire was one of the most anxiety inducing films I've ever seen, absolutely brilliant. Galveston, with our boy Ben Foster, was also really good.

I completely forgot that she directed Galveston! I think I'll watch that again this evening. I haven't seen our Ben on my screen in over a month at this stage. And that's far too long a break. 

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The Silent Partner (1978, Talking Pictures TV) I hadn't heard of this before, but saw Elliot Gould and Christopher Plummer as the stars and I was sold. It's a thriller with a really nice set-up -

6 is brilliant, but 5 has one of my favourite details - the guy playing Tommy in it was a born again Christian, and apparently only felt comfortable doing it when he realised that evil was punished in

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Thief

I'm not a massive Michael Mann fan and wasn't big on this when I first saw it, but I was wrong. Outside of The Insider, this is Mann's most clutter-free and direct film. Just brilliant, no-nonsense, industrial stuff. Absolutely outstanding.

Black Widow

Anyone expecting some Debra Winger / Theresa Russell G/G action will be sorely disappointed, but this is a smart little thriller that's a cut above most 80s neo-noirs. Interesting use of its cast too, and an unusual ending.

Reversal of Fortune

Jeremy Irons somehow manages to butcher his own accent in a tedious adaptation of Alan Dershowitz's bullshit account of the Claus von Bulow case. God bless Ron Silver though, in a deserved and rare lead role.

Deadline USA (ok.ru)

Superb journalism-oriented noir with Humphrey Bogart trying to keep his paper afloat while exposing a Mafia don. A bit preachy towards the end but you can rarely go wrong with Bogie, and Richard Brooks, who was a great and now mostly forgotten director.

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6 hours ago, Devon Malcolm said:

Thief

I'm not a massive Michael Mann fan and wasn't big on this when I first saw it, but I was wrong. Outside of The Insider, this is Mann's most clutter-free and direct film. Just brilliant, no-nonsense, industrial stuff. Absolutely outstanding.

 

Deadline USA (ok.ru)

Superb journalism-oriented noir with Humphrey Bogart trying to keep his paper afloat while exposing a Mafia don. A bit preachy towards the end but you can rarely go wrong with Bogie, and Richard Brooks, who was a great and now mostly forgotten director.

Between Heat, The Insider, Collateral and Thief, I guess I'd have to call myself a Michael Mann fan. I think Thief is an utter gem that way too many people haven't seen. Glad to see that you feel similar Dev, when coming from the view of not being as fond of his stuff. I keep trying to get my brother to watch it and he keeps putting it off. Best of it is, once he does give in, he'll be raging he waited as long. 

Enjoyed your post on the Noir's and Neo-Noir's on the last page, seen some of them, but not all, and your opinion on The Killers in particular has me wanting to seek it out. Second the love for Double Indemnity. Anyone that hasn't seen it by now, needs to get that changed pronto. 

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6 minutes ago, WeeAl said:

Between Heat, The Insider, Collateral and Thief, I guess I'd have to call myself a Michael Mann fan. I think Thief is an utter gem that way too many people haven't seen. Glad to see that you feel similar Dev, when coming from the view of not being as fond of his stuff. I keep trying to get my brother to watch it and he keeps putting it off. Best of it is, once he does give in, he'll be raging he waited as long. 

Enjoyed your post on the Noir's and Neo-Noir's on the last page, seen some of them, but not all, and your opinion on The Killers in particular has me wanting to seek it out. Second the love for Double Indemnity. Anyone that hasn't seen it by now, needs to get that changed pronto. 

I would list those as my favourites of his too, but I'm just not on board with this theory that crap like The Keep, Blackhat and Miami Vice are all misunderstood pieces of genius. They're all awful.

The Killers has been reworked a couple of times as well, and there was a pretty good 1964 remake by Don Siegel (who you can never go wrong with) with Lee Marvin (ditto) that's worth seeing. The original is public domain so you should find it knocking about online easily.

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Those Who Wish Me Dead is a good-ass thriller. I hope it's not such a long wait to see Jolie next in an action role again. Long live the Queen.

I often lose track of directing vs writing but whenever Taylor Sheridan's name pops up it's usually good.

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20 minutes ago, CleetusVanDamme said:

Those Who Wish Me Dead is a good-ass thriller. I hope it's not such a long wait to see Jolie next in an action role again. Long live the Queen.

I often lose track of directing vs writing but whenever Taylor Sheridan's name pops up it's usually good.

I was hoping to catch this at the cinema but it's not on at any time I could attend. But yeah, Sheridan is always a sign of quality, Wind River was really overlooked.

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The Woman in the Window (Netflix)

Well this was just shit, which seemed inconceivable until I actually watched it. A total mess that gives way to your usual stalk-and-slash shit, even Amy Adams is bad in it. My boy Wyatt Russell does his best with it but this is the biggest disappointment of the last couple of years by far.

Oxygen (Netflix)

Another entertaining bit of sci-fi fluff from Netflix and another good bit of disposable entertainment from Alexandre Aja. Knows its limitations and you get to look at nobody but Melanie Laurent for an hour and a half.

Shattered (Prime)

Typical, trashy 90s thriller with a couple of superb scenes and some amusing overacting by everyone, especially Greta Scacchi. Well worth spending an hour and a half with.

The Public Eye (ok.ru)

This was seen as an experiment to see how Joe Pesci fared in a lead role after the success of Home Alone and Goodfellas. He does great, obviously, but this is a little gem of a film that adds to the list of superb 90s neo-noirs.

From Hell

Johnny Depp and Heather Graham's respective terrible stabs (oh ho!) at Cockney accents aside, this was a lot more enjoyable than I was expecting. There's always something happening and some great globs of violence, plus the ending's actually quite satisfying.

A Perfect Murder

No idea why Viggo Mortensen decided to be a low-talker in this, but it's a reasonable Dial M for Murder rehash. Douglas - always great, Mortensen - bloody awful, Paltrow - breathtakingly stunning and also bloody awful. Good fun.

The Spook Who Sat by the Door (YouTube)

Little known blaxploitation film about a black activist who infiltrates the CIA. Not like any blaxploitation film you've ever seen, but a thoughtful, really well acted and angry piece of work that would have been hugely influential if its release hadn't been limited and even held back. 

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59 minutes ago, King of Hamptons said:

Watched Spookies last night, decent 80s horror. It did feel like that they had come up with loads of great practical Sfx and just wrote a film around them though. Definitely worth a watch though. 

There's a really good documentary about Spookies on the Vinegar Syndrome disc. Essentially the nob head producer fired everyone after they had shot 75% of the film. He hired a new director, completely new cast and put those bizarre sections with the ghoul, the wife in white and naff zombies in it that don't connect to the main plot at all.

It's a fun movie as it is but you can't help but think it would have been far more cohesive without the interference. The cast were absolutely furious with how it turned out.

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Have to say I quite enjoyed Unhinged with a fat Russell Crowe.  There was also a nice cover version of (Don't Fear) The Reaper during the end credits by Keep Shelly In Athens. I'd never heard of them until I had seen the movie.

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Apples

I don't even know where to start with this. A really smart, deadpan Greek arthouse gem which I got a lot out of. Possibly the cleverest film I've seen all year.

Total Recall

Still an 11/10.

Total Recall (Farrell one)

Really enjoyed this, and there is a bit where Kate Beckinsale slides on her knees towards old Colin, traps him between her thighs which might be the sexiest film move of all time.

Catch Me If You Can

I absolutely loved this. Tom Hanks is the greatest actor of all time, and I'm sorry I ever doubted him when I was younger. Just brilliant, and the opening credits are so fantastic. 

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On 4/15/2021 at 11:56 AM, Devon Malcolm said:

Bill Forsyth had a run, from That Sinking Feeling to Comfort and Joy, which is one of the best four film streaks of any director in history. All wonderful films, Comfort and Joy and Local Hero especially are brilliant.

Local Hero is on Film 4 for the next fortnight in case anyone wanted to check it out.  I watched it last night and thought it was just wonderful.  Peter Riegert is superb as Mack and is ably supported by a comedic Peter Capaldi.  It also stars Fulton Mackay and Matthew from Desmonds (and I was so waiting for "There's an old African saying...".  What more could you want!  

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Sorcerer (Amazon Prime)

This is utterly brutal and uncomfortable and brilliant. You can feel the pervasive heat and sweat in the film, and Roy Scheider is the perfect lead. But it's also hard work - the first hour involves multiple unconnected stories, subtitled in different languages. If you remember that long opening sequence in The Exorcist, it's like that but less easy to follow. But this all builds up to the second half, where each of the guys in the first half have fled to South America, and out of desperation agree to help transport fragile containers of nitroglycerine across jungle terrain, where the slightest jolt could immediately kill them. It's two hours long, the second hour is the truck stuff, and it feels like a much longer epic. It's physically exhausting it's so tense.

It absolutely died when it came out - Heaven's Gate-level died. Kermode tells a story about one of the producers going to a film premiere the week before to see how the trailer went down, and there's a little bubble of excitement for it. Then the lights go down, and the next words on-screen were 'A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...' and the guy suddenly realises the film is in trouble already. 

But it's brilliant. Stick with it, because fucking hell. As the third of a 70s trilogy, this followed The French Connection and The Exorcist for Friedkin. That's an astonishing run.

 

Clerks (Cinema!)

In a London art-house/cult cinema like a massive twat. There were newly-filmed intros by Brian O'Hallaran and Kevin Smith, who encouraged people to make their own movies and tell their own stories, which naturally appealed massively to me.

pcc.thumb.jpg.103b8d7cd10769e55155f50ef0cd63ca.jpg

The film has aged, and the acting is variable and some of the jokes are awkward. But it's still a game-changing inspiration for film-makers. Through a useful mix of likeability, easy-to-relate-to characters and situations and a decent line in filthy jokes and film references, it did well on practically no budget and filmed in a local shop. It's still a lot of fun too.

 

Night of the Creeps (The Horror Channel)

I love The Monster Squad, by the same director and co-writer. But the other co-writer was Shane Black for that one, and you really see what he brought to it. I didn't know anything about Night of the Creeps, and it now feels very much like a movie I saw. Starring Rusty from National Lampoon's European Vacation (who I mainly associate with sitting on a bench next to the first topless girl I ever saw on TV) and Tom Atkins (in a rare film I've seen with him in not made by John Carpenter). This was just there. I was really disappointed with it, as I was expecting something far more fun.

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Minari (cinema)

Pretty much as delightful as you've heard, and as well acted too. Steven Yeun is one of the most versatile actors around right now. I thought it faded slightly at the end but it's largely terrific and features one of the funniest scenes I think I've ever seen.

Brawl in Cell Block 99 (Film 4)

Didn't enjoy it *quite* as much second time round, probably because the violence doesn't land with quite the same impact, but this is still absolutely rock-hard crime stuff from Zahler, who could be one of the greats if he ditches the occasionally reprehensible politics.

He Ran All the Way (YouTube)

John Garfield's last film after the HUAC probably drove him to a stress-related heart attack and death, a brilliant old noir where he takes a family hostage after shooting a cop. One of the best crime films of the 1950s - if you like stuff like The Desperate Hours, Key Largo, that sort of thing (you should) then this is even better.

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