Jump to content

American pronunciation


chokeout
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Paid Members
18 minutes ago, chokeout said:

On American names I still don't understand how they got to pronouncing Craig as Creg and Graham as Gram

The one that I find interesting, and not sure which I prefer, is how we pronounce "Bernard" as "BURR-nud", and they pronounce it more like the French, "bur-NAARD".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Paid Members

Don’t get me started on American pronunciation of names. Craig? Nah, it’s “Creg”. And to this day I still don’t know if Americans are saying “Graham crackers” or “gram crackers”. Like, I’ve seen it written down as “Graham crackers” but when I hear it, I just question everything again.

Also, my name (Martin) in American just gets abbreviated to some single syllable “Mrtn” noise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Paid Members
29 minutes ago, deathrey said:

And why can't they pronounce the names of herbs correctly? It's not difficult.

The way they say "erb" is the one that mystifies: a lot of American spelling and pronunciation seems to follow a trend of being based more directly on Latin and Classical Greek, rather than on the French like British English. But they decide to go with French pronunciation for that one word?

I will say I think we pronounce "oregano" wrong, as the Americans pronounce it just like the Italians do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Paid Members

Edinburgh as "Edinburo", but Glasgow as "GlasGAU".

One thing I find intriguing about American pronunciation is the difference in stresses, largely because these tend to fly under the radar. I've only recently noticed some of them because my sister has been watching LOADS of US TV recently, and the differences in stress have creeped into her own speech. First one that comes to mind is the word "adult" - we say "A-dult", but they say "a-DULT". She's also been pronouncing "tuna" as "toona" rather than "tyoona". Then there's also that general pattern in American speech of de-stressing the final "-ile" in certain words, saying "docile" as "dossle", "missile" as "missle", and "sterile/fertile" as "sterrel/fertel".

EDIT: Just remembered that, until recently when American TV figures started pronouncing it properly, the only time I'd ever heard an American pronounce "Glasgow" the way the British do was Sean Mooney.

Edited by Carbomb
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...