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Fantastic Words and Where to Find Them


Gus Mears
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I'm not one for patriotism, but an area where I can safely say we have the Bosch, Frogs and Ruski's tanked is with language. English is an absurd amalgamation of old, new, foreign, domestic, local; combined into one barking potpourri that you could not possibly design with reasoning. In short, it's wonderful.

 

So a thread about words. Your favourites, whether they be obscure or not. Also, any local slang much appreciated.

 

Defenestration, the act of throwing someone out of a window, is probably my favourite word in the English language. Derived from Latin, yes, but the mere fact that there is a word for throwing a bloke out of a window is a fantastic triumph of mankind. Gratuitous and brilliant. 

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Laggard. If you think it means rat-arsed, you're wrong. It's one of the many words for someone who is slow. Sluggard is another beauty.

 

Flange is the funniest word. Sounds like something you'd use to wash your lady garden but isn't rude at all.

Edited by tiger_rick
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I love words. My favourite type of comedy is one that is clever with its use of the English language, particularly everything Armando Ianucci has ever done. I'm listening to old recordings of On The Hour in the car at the moment and the writing is just beautiful.

 

On a related note, I do love saying the word "buttress".

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I love any old-fashioned - kerfuffle in particular, mullarkey, anything along those lines.

 

My absolute favourite word though is tmesis. It's the only word in the whole English language that starts with the letters TM, and is the splitting of a word into compounds and then inserting another word in between - saying 'abso-bloody-lutely' for example, is tmesis.

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My family live in Lancashire and it's great to hear my gran use the word "boiled" for being drunk.

 

 

Oh, I like that. 

 

Words surrounding drinking are often fantastic.

 

Steaming, carousing, inebriation, ribaldry, sozzled, cockeyed. All good words, Brent. 

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There's loads of Scots' words that I love. They just seem a lot more descriptive than their English translation.

Dreich - used to describe a cold, grey day with light rain. Not sure there even is an English translation for this type of weather?

Loads of different words used for describing something unclean or dirty. Mawkit, boggin, clatty. There's a good few more.

Crabbit - someone who's a bit grumpy and snarly.

 

Footer - if someone's "footering aboot" they're being fidgety (love that word too)

 

Blether - talking, basically.

So many but I've probably bored you enough.

There's been words that I've always assumed to be standard English only to be told they're not like outwith or chap(when talking about knocking on a door) and there's others I've always thought were Scots but turned out not to be like dilly-dally - another word I love.

Words are good, I like words.

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