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Children's names & how important are they?


Dead Mike

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Over the xmas break at a family meal we were discussing children's names, my auntie is a mid-wife & my mum is a deputy head teacher. My mum said that at the various schools she'd taught at there was a trend amongst the more disruptive kids having 'non-traditional' names. My auntie added that in her experience parents from more affluent backgrounds were less likely to give their child a 'trendy' name or be influenced by popular culture when naming a child than parents from poorer areas. Do you think that in the next 10-20 years we'll have a bevy of doctors, barristers, judges etc named Romeo, Jayden, Chelsea & Britney? Does a kids name have an influence on them or is purely down to parental interaction during their education & formative years?

I was interested to see if any studies have been done into this. Also, when does giving a kid a made up name become child abuse? There was a fairly recent case in Australia that led to registrar's being able to stop parents from giving their kids daft names after a young girl took her parents to court (think her name was 'bus stop' or 'telephone box'). My aunt said that there was a trend of a lot of young girls being called Rhianna at the moment but she'd had instances of someone wanting to call their son 'Reebok' whilst a mate of mines 16 year old babysitter intended to call her unborn son 'Snoop'.

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Ive always thought giving a child a name that has a certain sound to it, would for some reason infulence the child when growing up into acting a certain way. Like for example, if the name sounds sharp/like you may have to shout t osay it......it would have a negative impact on th child.

 

I said this whilst naming my daughter, and my misses thought it was a load of bollocks, and we settled on Maisy for our daughters name. Even though im not 100% sure she'll apreciate the name when she 18, but thats just me.

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Over the xmas break at a family meal we were discussing children's names, my auntie is a mid-wife & my mum is a deputy head teacher. My mum said that at the various schools she'd taught at there was a trend amongst the more disruptive kids having 'non-traditional' names. My auntie added that in her experience parents from more affluent backgrounds were less likely to give their child a 'trendy' name or be influenced by popular culture when naming a child than parents from poorer areas. Do you think that in the next 10-20 years we'll have a bevy of doctors, barristers, judges etc named Romeo, Jayden, Chelsea & Britney? Does a kids name have an influence on them or is purely down to parental interaction during their education & formative years?

 

There's a bit in the book Freakonomics that gives some stats and trends on the correlation between people's names and their levels of education/success; you should check it out...

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There's a bit in the book Freakonomics that gives some stats and trends on the correlation between people's names and their levels of education/success; you should check it out...

 

Nice one, I'll see if it's in the library on Saturday.

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Over the xmas break at a family meal we were discussing children's names, my auntie is a mid-wife & my mum is a deputy head teacher. My mum said that at the various schools she'd taught at there was a trend amongst the more disruptive kids having 'non-traditional' names. My auntie added that in her experience parents from more affluent backgrounds were less likely to give their child a 'trendy' name or be influenced by popular culture when naming a child than parents from poorer areas. Do you think that in the next 10-20 years we'll have a bevy of doctors, barristers, judges etc named Romeo, Jayden, Chelsea & Britney? Does a kids name have an influence on them or is purely down to parental interaction during their education & formative years?

 

There's a bit in the book Freakonomics that gives some stats and trends on the correlation between people's names and their levels of education/success; you should check it out...

 

It explains it pretty well, in a nutshell, kids with non-traditional names generally come from poorer and less educated backgrounds so are likely to be less successful when they grown up. Kids with traditional names tended to come from educated backgrounds so were likely to be successful.

 

The actual name itself had no real bearing, e.g. successful intelligent parents naming their daughter Mercedes rather than Claire will have little bearing on her success as it's pretty determined by birth that the kid is going to be more successful than Mercedes born of uneducated parents. the same goes the other way, uneducated parents giving a traditional name doesn't mean the kid will be any brighter.

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It explains it pretty well, in a nutshell, kids with non-traditional names generally come from poorer and less educated backgrounds so are likely to be less successful when they grown up. Kids with traditional names tended to come from educated backgrounds so were likely to be successful.

 

The actual name itself had no real bearing, e.g. successful intelligent parents naming their daughter Mercedes rather than Claire will have little bearing on her success as it's pretty determined by birth that the kid is going to be more successful than Mercedes born of uneducated parents. the same goes the other way, uneducated parents giving a traditional name doesn't mean the kid will be any brighter.

The best story that illustrates that is about the brothers Winner and Loser.

 

They made the point that it's not surprising that a girl called Temptress was up in court as a teenager for underaged sex, but that the reasoning wasn't because that was what her particular name was. Rather, it was the case that someone whose mother was so unintelligent as to give her such a name (which was supposed to be Tempest anyway) would have been likely to have been in trouble anyway because of her background. It wasn't the name that doomed her, so much as the conditions that made it likely to have such a name anyway.

 

Ditto for the kid called Amcher. It wasn't the unusual name itself that caused him to be in trouble, but the circumstances that caused him to have such a name. His parents hadn't even been bothered to think about what they would call him, so named him after the first thing they saw when heading into the hospital, which was a sign indicating AMCHER: Albany Medical Center Hospital Emergency Room. A kid whose parents hadn't even thought about naming him was always going to struggle.

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When we were expecting our daughter, we said from the start we wanted a traditional name, not some chav name invented by the scriptwriters of Hollyoakes. We went with Emily.

 

Unfortunately, Emily's aunts/uncles didn't feel the same and she now has cousins by the name of Atlanta and Chardonnay.

 

If her dad is called Michael, Buddy or Terry then take it back.

 

I used to like the name Jake until I met one in work. I now wish to acquire a time machine to go back and destroy the originator of this accursed tag.

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I've got bad associations with the name Kimberley mainly because the girl who bullied me for several years in secondary school had that name. Ravenhill, was Atlanta concieved there? And Chardonnay is obviously after the wine!

 

If I have kids in the future, I'm sticking to normal names like Ben and Amy or maybe Ruth.

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I've got bad associations with the name Kimberley mainly because the girl who bullied me for several years in secondary school had that name. Ravenhill, was Atlanta concieved there? And Chardonnay is obviously after the wine!

 

If I have kids in the future, I'm sticking to normal names like Ben and Amy or maybe Ruth.

Nope, they've never been to America. In my opinion, they named her that because they're idiots. Ravenhill isn't the type of surname you can chuck any first name at.

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It explains it pretty well, in a nutshell, kids with non-traditional names generally come from poorer and less educated backgrounds so are likely to be less successful when they grown up. Kids with traditional names tended to come from educated backgrounds so were likely to be successful.

 

The actual name itself had no real bearing, e.g. successful intelligent parents naming their daughter Mercedes rather than Claire will have little bearing on her success as it's pretty determined by birth that the kid is going to be more successful than Mercedes born of uneducated parents. the same goes the other way, uneducated parents giving a traditional name doesn't mean the kid will be any brighter.

 

This pretty much supports my mid-wife Aunt's experience of parents from poorer backrounds being significantly more likely to give their child a more unconventional name.

One of my main gripes is people giving their child a shortened name & therefore limiting the kids options when it grows up. Surely if you want to call your child 'Jamie' when he's tiny & cute just name him 'James'. That way when he's 30 years old & potentially 6ft 3 & 19 stone he can call himself 'Jim' or 'James' & not be stuck with a name fitting only for kids & TV presenters.

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