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Little things you never knew


Egg Shen

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i'm a sucker for little facts, and when i find out something that's been staring me in the face for years that i never knew about it i feel the need that i have to tell people...

 

it aint every day that you find out these little facts but i just found out one that i need to share, it's boxing/HBO related so this won't appeal to everyone here but here it is:

 

Liev Schrieber is the narrator of all the HBO boxing program's like 24/7 series...well i be damned, ive heard his voice on these things for years and i never knew it was him.

 

anyone else got any little tidbits that surprised you?

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I'll be honest, I always thought it was Curt Henning and not Hennig. It was someone on here who pointed that out.

 

I'm sure we had one of these threads a while back and someone posted that Uncle Phil from Fresh Prince voiced Shredder in the Turtles cartoon. That blew my mind

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I'll be honest, I always thought it was Curt Henning and not Hennig. It was someone on here who pointed that out.

First time I found out Perfect's real name was when I saw it in an old issue of PWI when I was about 10. I knew it was Hennig, but wanted it to be Henning. Hennig is just plain silly.

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I'm sure we had one of these threads a while back and someone posted that Uncle Phil from Fresh Prince voiced Shredder in the Turtles cartoon. That blew my mind

 

Mr. Feeney from Boy Meets World is the voice of the Knight Rider car.

 

Of course! :facepalm: I should have realised that.

 

 

Here's one that's obvious to me, but often fucks with people's heads. Every sound you hear in a Hollywood movie is added on afterwards, apart sometimes from speech. Everything.

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Little fact you may not be aware of - this thread will not get past the first page without someone passing on some commonly believed but untrue myth/rumour.

 

Misinformation Thread.

 

I want sources! Where did that statistic come from, fruitcorner??

Unfortunately the source is a friend of mine who used to love quoting that statistic when we were in 6th form- so I have no proof I'm afraid :(

 

Whether it's true or not, I still love it and bust it out once in a while.

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I'm sure we had one of these threads a while back and someone posted that Uncle Phil from Fresh Prince voiced Shredder in the Turtles cartoon. That blew my mind

 

Mr. Feeney from Boy Meets World is the voice of the Knight Rider car.

 

Of course! :facepalm: I should have realised that.

 

 

Here's one that's obvious to me, but often fucks with people's heads. Every sound you hear in a Hollywood movie is added on afterwards, apart sometimes from speech. Everything.

 

Sorry to disagree with you because you are close but when you said "EVERYTHING" I thought I should reiterate what actually happens.

 

The process which you are referring to is called "foley recording". This is when foley artists will create fake sounds to enhance the viewers listening pleasure. This is commonly demonstrated by coconut shells being used to mimic the noise of horses galloping. Foley is used to enhance a movie or TV programme but it is not meant to completely replace sounds that occur naturally in the recording. If a scene was shot that had a gun shot go off the gun shot will only be replaced by foley if the dubbing mixer deems the gunshot not suitable enough. More often that not sounds like that will be left in. Foley is used to add things that would not be picked up by normal microphones but would be by the human ear. Things like clothes rustles and floorboard squeeks will not be picked up by a microphone that is recording a person's dialogue but would be expected to be heard by the human ear. In this case the added foley will enhance the audio soundtrack but not replace it.

Another point is that speech is only added in afterwards in rare occasions. The vast majority of dialogue that you hear in films and tv is recoded at the same time as the pictures. Although it doesn't work like a home video camera would work where the audio and pic are both recorded onto tape. The camera captures the picture and the sound recordist captures the audio only on tape or as WAV files. It is then synced together at the edit stage to bring the audio and video elements back together.

If for any reason a line of dialogue is inaudible or the writers want to change a line this is done by a process called ADR (additional dialogue recording). This is where actors will be called back in to re-record the audio for certain lines and these are then mixed into the audio soundtrack to make it seem as seemless as possible. This is avoided where possible and is often covered by using a shot of the back of someone's head to cover the fact that the character in vision is not saying the same as the audio you are hearing. This is easier to disguise on TV (or it was before HD TV came about) as you were less likely to see things like this on a small TV. On a 100ft wide cinema screen you will almost certainly see if an actor is not saying the correct lines.

 

Sorry to jump in there but I thought I would add some clarification.

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I'm sure we had one of these threads a while back and someone posted that Uncle Phil from Fresh Prince voiced Shredder in the Turtles cartoon. That blew my mind

 

Mr. Feeney from Boy Meets World is the voice of the Knight Rider car.

 

Of course! :facepalm: I should have realised that.

 

 

Here's one that's obvious to me, but often fucks with people's heads. Every sound you hear in a Hollywood movie is added on afterwards, apart sometimes from speech. Everything.

 

Sorry to disagree with you because you are close but when you said "EVERYTHING" I thought I should reiterate what actually happens.

 

The process which you are referring to is called "foley recording". This is when foley artists will create fake sounds to enhance the viewers listening pleasure. This is commonly demonstrated by coconut shells being used to mimic the noise of horses galloping. Foley is used to enhance a movie or TV programme but it is not meant to completely replace sounds that occur naturally in the recording. If a scene was shot that had a gun shot go off the gun shot will only be replaced by foley if the dubbing mixer deems the gunshot not suitable enough. More often that not sounds like that will be left in. Foley is used to add things that would not be picked up by normal microphones but would be by the human ear. Things like clothes rustles and floorboard squeeks will not be picked up by a microphone that is recording a person's dialogue but would be expected to be heard by the human ear. In this case the added foley will enhance the audio soundtrack but not replace it.

Another point is that speech is only added in afterwards in rare occasions. The vast majority of dialogue that you hear in films and tv is recoded at the same time as the pictures. Although it doesn't work like a home video camera would work where the audio and pic are both recorded onto tape. The camera captures the picture and the sound recordist captures the audio only on tape or as WAV files. It is then synced together at the edit stage to bring the audio and video elements back together.

If for any reason a line of dialogue is inaudible or the writers want to change a line this is done by a process called ADR (additional dialogue recording). This is where actors will be called back in to re-record the audio for certain lines and these are then mixed into the audio soundtrack to make it seem as seemless as possible. This is avoided where possible and is often covered by using a shot of the back of someone's head to cover the fact that the character in vision is not saying the same as the audio you are hearing. This is easier to disguise on TV (or it was before HD TV came about) as you were less likely to see things like this on a small TV. On a 100ft wide cinema screen you will almost certainly see if an actor is not saying the correct lines.

 

Sorry to jump in there but I thought I would add some clarification.

 

Uh... yes, I did used to work as a sound engineer in film, so I'm aware of all that. You're wrong on a number of points though.

 

In major film productions, the chance of a sound you hear being recorded in situ is incredibly low. You'll never hear a "gunshot" recorded on location, to use your example. There are many reasons for that, not just because of audio fidelity or the appropriateness of the sound (real guns not sounding like you expect, for example) but a main one is that for foreign dubs of a film, you have to provide the soundtrack of the film with just dialogue removed. It's easier to record every footstep and cloth rustle than it is to try and isolate dialogue from location recording but leave in that sort of sound. So in pretty much every case the sound you hear will be added in post. Every car passing, bird tweeting, wave lapping, engine roaring... all of it.

 

As regards speech, again a LOT more of it is ADR than you realise. In a blockbuster like, say, War Of The Worlds, probably 50% will be. As someone who's spend days of his life editing people's voices to fit into the lipsync of the original take, I can attest to that. We're just very good at it, so the layman tends not to notice :) On tv, it's different, but as a rule of thumb, if a character is doing anything apart from sitting or standing (such as running, firing a gun, on a jetski, swimming, jumping on to the wing of a jet righter etc. etc.), it's ADR.

 

Anyway... it's still fairly incredible for the average viewer.

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I'll contribute the same thing I always do when this thread pops up: the bloke in the R White's Lemonade advert, creeping downstairs in his PJs, is Elvis Costello's dad.

 

Also, one I heard the other week when I was away was that when the University of Nebraska's American Football team plays at home, their stadium becomes the state's third largest city.

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