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Is British Wrestling too flakey?


Michael_3165

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Quick wondering and thought I would get peoples ideas on this... I was at the NOAH show last night and was sitting with two mates (a non fan and a semi casual fan) and they LOVED the NOAH guys work. BUT the one thing they couldn't warm to was the all UK dark match. Now I am a huge british wrestling fan especially the British style. Havin done training, I always had a love for technical wrestling that some others don't. The issue I find is that british wrestlers often seem to have a fear of laying it in and as a result it looks phoney and put on. Now I don't mean hammer each other or anything but I tend to find that it comes off very "panto" and puts off many fans who may show an interest. I can guarentee the people I went with last night will look up NOAH at least online. But both said they wouldn't go to a UK only show because it didn't look realistic.

 

Havin done a year of training it seemed apparent that trainees were disuaded from being "too stiff". Personally I loved it when I felt it because it made It easier to sell it. But do you think this is a problem or not? Before anyone says it, I have seen Knight, Zebra kid etc live so know there ARE a lot of guys that do throw bombs in the ring but strikes in the UK off come off as weak. Is this a UK schooling issue or a worldwide problem? If its a problem at all!

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If you have to actually hit someone to make it look like you're hitting them, you're doing it wrong. Bret Hart once said that this is an art form.

Totally agree. However there's connecting lightly and making it look real (which is how it should be done) and then there's REAL light! James Mason is a perfect example of a British wrestler whose light but looks like he's clouting his opponent.

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If you have to actually hit someone to make it look like you're hitting them, you're doing it wrong. Bret Hart once said that this is an art form.

 

But how many guys in the UK (or anywhere else) can actually do that nowadays? I mean realistically. Its a lovely concept in theory but at the end of the day there's very few people that can do it well. Partly this is the small amount of time workin on punching/striking techniques during training. It is often focused on movez, psychology etc but strikes is one thing that seems to get neglected.

 

Would you say that the NOAH guys are doing it "wrong"? I mean iam a believer that you can hit someone without hurting them and that's the art. Look at The Rock and Hall they connected with an open palm slap to the neck, Vader used to do punches but you never saw bruising, Angle hits with an open palm and connects. Same as kicks. Last night Nakajima was layin the kicks in but the chances of leaving lasting effects are probably minimal. Does that make him, Kobashi, Misawa, KENTA and others "wrong" because they are connecting with force at times?

 

I think - like Ravenhill says - weak or even missed punches are massive pet hates with me. I really believe that if you can't do em stiffly enough but without hurting someone, just don't do it at all. One of the biggest issues at the moment are forearms. Weak forearms are horrific viewing for me (and many others)

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If you have to actually hit someone to make it look like you're hitting them, you're doing it wrong. Bret Hart once said that this is an art form.

Totally agree. However there's connecting lightly and making it look real (which is how it should be done) and then there's REAL light! James Mason is a perfect example of a British wrestler whose light but looks like he's clouting his opponent.

 

That's my point. Connect, show some power, don't kill each other but make it look good. A lot don't!

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If you have to actually hit someone to make it look like you're hitting them, you're doing it wrong. Bret Hart once said that this is an art form.

 

That is 100% correct. The only thing with it is they dont practice it. They just assume they can do it because its just a forearm smash/uppercut. If it was practiced then they'd be able to throw it in, make it look hard but actually no one gets hurt. Also the guy taking it needs to know how to sell the shot. Snapping his head back actually makes it look hard even if it wouldnt had they kept their head still. Little things like this need to be constantly practiced to keep it you confident in throwing it in but not actually 'stiffing' your opponent

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That audience gets all the american style wrestling they could wish for on TV. Why would they pay money to see more of the same from guys they don't really know?

 

That's fine if you want to just Wrestle in the British scene all your life but most of the Brits want to either be WWE stars or big name Indy stars, travelling the bigger known groups like TNA's X Division, ROH or going to Japan or Mexico.

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