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Wrestling moves in Hapkido


Richie Freebird

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Trawling youtube due to boredom I came across a short video mini documentary about the Korean Self defence martial art Hapkido. During the video there are various ridiculously over sold flips trips and throws, and I was pleasantly surprised to see a couple of flying heads-scissors and snapmares right out of the pro wrestling playbook!

 

 

Again, probably not worthy of muuuuch discussion, but I was entertained enough to share it with my fellow UKFF

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There's a Figure-Four type move in Judo, although it's probably closer to a Sharpshooter in terms of how you position the legs over the knee. Not sure what it's called, though.

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I did a bit of Hapkido a few years ago, well it was called Sul Ki Do but it was essentially the same thing. Got to green belt in it before I moved away from the dojang.

 

They have a lot of really cool armbar-style locks and throws, as you see in that slightly-overplayed video. They also have some unusual emphasis on defence against multiple opponents, and what I can only describe as "finishers" - my favourite being a wristlock into a hiptoss throw that ends with you shattering the bones in your opponents forearm by bracing it against the floor and striking the palm.

 

The other cool thing they do is pressure point work, something you see in kung fu movies but I can attest that it really fucking hurts.

 

All in all, a very cool martial arts, the best I've tried, that I would love to have done to black belt, but it's hard to find a dojang.

 

I'm surprised it hasn't found its way into MMA more, as the takedowns from striking kicks are much better than the ones I've seen in UFC.

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Well, two things. Firstly, if someone twists your wrist in the right way, you're going over. Secondly, we used to practice breakfalls and you minimise the damage by landing in the correct position (similar to taking a bump properly in wrestling) so there's a bit of people getting themselves up in the air to get a proper breakfall. Anyone who's done some MMA or jitsu training has probably done this as well.

 

But, no, that stuff was over-emphasised. If you want to do well in a grading though, you have to put in that sort of energy as Korean martial arts emphasise crispness and energy in formal demonstrations of the art.

 

Being British, or course, I wasn't practicing in a well-padded dojang like that, I was doing it onto a 1970s gymnastics mat on a hard floor so if I had jumped that high I'd probably never have got up again.

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Here's the Martial Art I specialise in. It could do with being used far more in Pro Wrestling, and all walks of daily life.

 

 

That half nelson into a backbreaker rounded off with a chop to the neck is fucking ace! Pro Wrestling matches wouldn't last very long with those kind of techniques.

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I did Hapkido for a few years, and yes there are snapmare type throws, and the good old Britwres wristlock is in there. I'm pretty sure I never saw anyone do a flying headscissors during that time though.

 

Hapkido the film is pretty good for it's time, and it's aged reasonably well. Chi Hon Choi (The "father of modern Hapkido") is in Game Of Death.

Phillip Rhee shows off his Hapkido skills in the Best of the Best films (mostly in number 2).

 

Overall, I liked Hapkido a lot. Flash kicks, joint locks and takedowns, and because it was fashionable at the time, we did some kali stick drills too.

 

There's an Indian martial art I saw a documentary on once that had snapmares in, and some interesting arm and wrist locks that can be easily incorporated into chain wrestling.

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like most martial arts everything is moderated to a certain key move, so if the guys does a right cross then you can block, twist and flip him. Which looks great in a demonstration where your showing the artistic side of blocking a right cross BUT when you have a drunk prick out his tits on coke probably the last thing he`ll do is tell you hes going to throw a right cross.

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Whilst Hapkido looks very fancy I dare say 90% of it is not practical in a real world encounter. This is the same with most martial arts.

The reason MMA is so fantastic to watch is it is a blend of techniques that WORK the best on one on one situations.

 

I would DEFO be up for Cat-BO!!! Wish they done more of these skits with the cat :(

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