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Which wrestlers loved/liked working for WCW?


FireBrand

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You hear that people like Cena are company men who stay loyal not only to WWE but Vince, the see the WWE as a fantastic company not just because it is the premuim establishment for pro-wrestling but because they genuine love the place.

 

However after WCW went under all the seemed to hear were a lot of talent saying how they knew the company was finished because of how it was run. Wether that be money loss, politics, mismanagement, moral all I heard from the WCW roster was negative things about WCW a complete mirror to how people expressed their feelings for the WWE.

 

So which ex-WCW actually liked working for them and I don't mean because they got a hefty payday or were allowed to do whatever they wanted i.e Nash.

 

I mean wrestlers that believed in the product and style of WCW.

 

As an example I guess I could sense pride in WCW from people like Gordon Solie and Jim Ross in the late 80's and early 90's, I felt from how they performed that they actually felt WCW was THE place to be.

 

How true that is I don't know.

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I don't think it can be that true, because Ross landed in the WWF well before WCW folded. Flair did as well for a bit. Sting was pretty much the only one that didn't, and even he used to fuck off home for months at a time so he never seemed to take any great pride in WCW. DDP, maybe? Booker T?

 

It's a lot easier for a wrestler to be a WWE loyalist now, because it's the only real game in town, though wrestlers had that loyalty way before WCW went under. The difference is Vince McMahon. WCW never really had a man in charge that inspired company loyalty the way Vinnie Mac does when he becomes a father figure to the daddy-issue screw-ups that come through the doors.

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You hear that people like Cena are company men who stay loyal not only to WWE but Vince, the see the WWE as a fantastic company not just because it is the premuim establishment for pro-wrestling but because they genuine love the place.

 

However after WCW went under all the seemed to hear were a lot of talent saying how they knew the company was finished because of how it was run. Wether that be money loss, politics, mismanagement, moral all I heard from the WCW roster was negative things about WCW a complete mirror to how people expressed their feelings for the WWE.

 

So which ex-WCW actually liked working for them and I don't mean because they got a hefty payday or were allowed to do whatever they wanted i.e Nash.

 

I mean wrestlers that believed in the product and style of WCW.

 

As an example I guess I could sense pride in WCW from people like Gordon Solie and Jim Ross in the late 80's and early 90's, I felt from how they performed that they actually felt WCW was THE place to be.

 

How true that is I don't know.

 

I would say Goldberg, I mean how many times did he have to job to anybody?

 

I would also say all the over the hill guys who got jobs when nobody else would of really wanted them like Jim Duggan, Brutas Beefcake, Nasty Boys, Norman Smiley, Virgil, Boss Man and also ECW guys like Sandman, Mike Awesome and Lance Storm who got to up a level at a time when their characters would struggle to fit in the WWE attitude era.

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I would say Goldberg, I mean how many times did he have to job to anybody?

 

I would also say all the over the hill guys who got jobs when nobody else would of really wanted them like Jim Duggan, Brutas Beefcake, Nasty Boys, Norman Smiley, Virgil, Boss Man and also ECW guys like Sandman, Mike Awesome and Lance Storm who got to up a level at a time when their characters would struggle to fit in the WWE attitude era.

 

So which ex-WCW actually liked working for them and I don't mean because they got a hefty payday or were allowed to do whatever they wanted i.e Nash.
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I see what your pointing out but if you got the chance to work for one of the big two and you know the other wouldnt want you then would money matter? as long as the money is a decent level. WCW are at fault for their silly contacts not the wrestlers, only some abused it because of that reason.

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So which ex-WCW actually liked working for them and I don't mean because they got a hefty payday or were allowed to do whatever they wanted i.e Nash.

I dont think you can discount that. You would think Batista was a company guy, but if there was a WCW around now, I'm sure he'd take the money. I dont think many people are loyal to a company. They are either loyal to money (i.e. Hogan, Nash, Hall, Luger etc), they know that the grass isnt greener on the otherside (Bret and Undertaker being examples of this in the 90s) or they dont want to rock the boat and end up on there arse if the other company doesnt want them. Wrestling was different in the 90s. There wasnt a "sign this and like it" attitude towards the wrestlers pay as bad as it is today. If they were paid correctly they were loyal. If not they were away. Even television writers were jumping ship in the WCW era.

 

DDP was loyal to Bischoff, and in late 99 when Russo came in was desperate to leave. Even the SKY TEXT PAGE!!~ said he was on the way to the WWF. When WCW really hit the shit in 2000, Flair went home, Hogan went home, Luger went home, DDP went home, Scott Hall never turned up and was suspended eventually, Nash never read a script and fucked about, Scott Steiner did whatever he wanted, Sid played softball every Sunday, which made him miss Monday Nitro for someone reason (?). I dont think there was any loyalty in WCW. The money was guarenteed and once they realised PPV and merchandise bonuses werent an issue anymore, what was the point in coming to work? That was the logic anyway.

 

WCW are at fault for their silly contacts not the wrestlers

Shawn Michaels and The Undertaker are/were on deals better (and if you count the bonuses probably much, much more) than most of the WCW headliners (not including Hogans freakishly good deal) and they showed its possibly to be in your 40s, haved a reduced schedule and not be bone-idle. If your getting paid all that money, you should at least show up. Sting went on strike in early 2000 and nobody seemed to know what for. To be fair to Goldberg, he did all the ill-advised shit they asked him to do like smash his hand into glass and turn heel. Until he went home and refused to return until they upped his money.

 

I loved WCW, though. Fucking miss it. I think it was actually the likes of Jarrett and Jeremy Borash who loved working for WCW. They still talk fondly about it today.

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While not massively pushed, I recon most of the mexican crusierweights enjoyed WCW because they got more oppertunties that they would have in WWE and were performing in the US.

Also when WCW had there agreements with NJPW, stars like Muta, Liger etc probably enjoyed the experiences as it was a chance to work with talented wrestlers and perform in front of a audience.

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I mean wrestlers that believed in the product and style of WCW.

 

I think this is the problem. The product and style changed all the time.

 

I'm sure a lot of wrestlers believed in the product at certain points but then someone else would be put in charge and the product would be changed competely. Jim Ross must have loved his job when he was calling Ric Flair vs Ricky Steamboat or Steiners vs Williams and Gordy but must've hated coming to work when he had to try and get shit like Van Hammer, PN Newz or THE CHAMBER OF HORRORS over.

 

Same goes for the later era. When WCW was at it's peak from '96 to '98 when Nitro was two, sometimes three hours of just fantastic television, they must've loved it. After that, when everything completely fell apart and storylines were being started and then immediately abandoned and the top guys just gave up or fucked around with no punishment, it must've been horrible. By the end, I can completely understand why most of the roster hated coming to work.

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This is a good post - you rarely hear of anyone talking glowingly of WCW. As other posters have mentioned, it's probably they had too many bosses over the time period of '89 til Death, too many people who could wrong/screw/job them.

 

Totally agree with Nash. And Hall too! These guys got more pay, less dates, more TV time, more talk and to be themselves more. There's no way Nash/Hall would be moaning if you asked them early '98 how they felt. If i remember correctly they both got massive payrises in '97 when the NWO was hot, I think around 800K(?) which would only include a handful of house dates.

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This is a good post - you rarely hear of anyone talking glowingly of WCW. As other posters have mentioned, it's probably they had too many bosses over the time period of '89 til Death, too many people who could wrong/screw/job them.

 

Totally agree with Nash. And Hall too! These guys got more pay, less dates, more TV time, more talk and to be themselves more. There's no way Nash/Hall would be moaning if you asked them early '98 how they felt. If i remember correctly they both got massive payrises in '97 when the NWO was hot, I think around 800K(?) which would only include a handful of house dates.

 

Didnt there contracts also state that essentially that no new guys could earn more than them. Think Big Show says something to that effect on the Rise and Fall of WCW doc

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