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Nash tweets about Jackson Andrews

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On his Twitter page, Kevin Nash commented on comparisons between himself and WWE star (and Tyson Kidd's bodyguard) Jackson Andrews:

 

"No. 1, Jackson Andrews is not as pretty as me," wrote Nash. "And No. 2, not the sarcastic prick I am. Doesn't have my guidance. 3 strikes you're out."

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I literally worship everything this man does.

 

The biggest kicker (and he knows it), is that he is the sh*ts in the ring and yet has achieved and maintained a high profile in the business for 17 years which has netted him multi millions!

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The biggest kicker (and he knows it), is that he is the sh*ts in the ring and yet has achieved and maintained a high profile in the business for 17 years which has netted him multi millions!

 

I wouldn't go that far. Giant Gonzales and Giant Silva were the shits in the ring, Nash at his worst was at least competent. At times I thought a motivated Nash was a very good worker for his size although I can see why others don't but at the very least he knew what he was doing out there. There are plenty of worse workers who've been given the chance to make money (not as much as Nash, mostly) based on size alone.

 

Granted Gonzales and Silva bombed but Great Khali has done pretty well for himself. I don't think Nash is the worst in-ring performer to get over. Big Daddy made a truck-load of money (taking into account inflation and the lesser wages in British wrestling anyway) by Britwres standards and you'd be hard-pressed to find a match of his as good as Diesel's NHB matches with Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels.

 

Not sure about how Jackson Andrews fits in as a wrestler (whenever that happens) since I haven't seen any of his Florida matches but as a bodyguard I do think he adds to Kidd's gimmick.

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Big Daddy made a truck-load of money (taking into account inflation and the lesser wages in British wrestling anyway) by Britwres standards and you'd be hard-pressed to find a match of his as good as Diesel's NHB matches with Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels.

 

If Big Daddy ever had a match with Bret Hart back in the day then he'd at least have a chance of having a match as good as Nash's.

 

No suprise that the matches to showcase Nash involve two of the greatest workers of our lifetimes.

 

Who did Bret not ever get a good match out of??

 

I'm side-tracking the topic a little here... but, yeah, Jackson Andrews screams 'Deisel!'.

I would anticipate that he's rubbish on all levels.

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Nash had good matches with lots of people though (in this case I think conventional thought is right I think the Bret and Shawn ones are probably the best singles) - Dustin, Razor, Undertaker, Benoit, Jarrett, Booker T., Goldberg, Giant admittedly with the exception of the last three (although I rate them all higher than most) those guys are generally regarded as quality workers (Dustin, Benoit and Jarrett in particular) but I'm not sure someone like Khali, Daddy, The Crusher (admittedly from the very little I've seen) or various others who headlined would have been able to have matches that good against them.

 

Nash wasn't the best big man ever but he he moved around pretty well for a guy that size, had good execution (or at least used to haven't seen his much of his TNA stuff if he's gotten sloppier) of the limited moves he did and worked very hard to improve during his WWF run (1994-95 he seemed to be trying new things all the time and just working on his overall act).

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I found it a bit odd from Nash in his RF Shoot that he said he had his best matches with Bret... considering his allegiances and all that with Shawn, and the shoot was filmed a few years back now.

 

Well, not odd. I think what I mean to say is that he seems like an honest chap, saying it how it is. Gotta give him some respect.

 

Personally though, I never enjoyed anything he done in WWF. He was a big part of me switching off from wrestling when he started to get pushed (although it was a combination of all the abominations in WWF at the time). The viewing figures suggest I'm right proper in the majority for once on this score!

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Fair enough. I wouldn't say I was a huge Nash fan by any stretch and some of the praise he's gotten the last five or so years puzzles me a bit but I do think he at least knows what he's doing (at his worst) and at his best was actually pretty handy (I'd say around KOTR 1994-1998, with odd flashes since like the matches I mentioned earlier).

 

I think his WWF run was the bit I enjoyed most from his career. Wasn't a fan of much of his earlier work where he did look something like the awkward stiff he is made out to be, unless he was in there with a pro like Dustin (WCW) or Bret (the Coliseum Video matches). Actually, I quite liked his and DDP's team in 1992 for some reason which is strange since neither were the type of wrestlers I normally went for in those days.

 

Thought the Rumble showing where he was booked to look like a monster was cool and probably the thing that made me a fan of someone I already liked a bit before then. Marked for the IC Title switch with Razor. Liked the initial slow-burn babyface turn and loved the way they dragged it out at the time (really did think it was going to come to an end at SummerSlam) and the story of him winning the Triple Crown in one year. Really liked the early days of his title run at the time (although haven't seen much since) with not just the PPVs with Bret and Shawn but the TV matches with Owen, Jarrett and Bigelow - seemed like he was motivated in those days and they stuck him in there with all of their best workers.

 

Wasn't a massive fan of the rest of his title run (although credit for trying considering he got guys like Sid and Mabel) and in retrospect they should have booked him against more guys who could work (like they did in the early days) for longer (I'd have taken a Jarrett or heel Bigelow push if they'd gone that way) but from Survivor Series '95 until he left was when he was at his peak for me as a character and probably as a worker. One of the most fun characters in either company (along with Luger - who was also doing the tweener gimmick, crazy Pillman, Camp Cornette, The Giant, the Flair/Savage, Bret/Shawn and Finlay/Regal fueds) for me in those days. Even though I was a WCW fan I was still gutted when he left because I was really getting into the HBK/Diesel feud. Always preferred Hall in WCW.

 

By around Spring '99 he really was phoning it in a lot of the time, almost to the extent he did become the wrestler Jim Cornette had described a couple of years earlier, and just seemed boring to watch a lot of the time and had some abominably bad matches with guys Sid and thought the DDP feud was really disappointing. I do think he deserved a lot of the criticism he got by that point, but he could still pull out a good showing (like against Booker in 2000 and rematch with Goldberg '99) when he could be bothered.

 

That said, he's not someone I feel like "Oh, I'd really like to see him wrestle again". More some I liked as a teenager (matches promos and promos) but went off by '99.

 

I'd be inclined to agree with him about the Bret matches being his best.

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Nash is quite a intelligent man as hes survived around wrestling for as long as he had, he knows his strengths and plays to them, mainly using his brain in the ring and backstage.

 

The only comparison between the two is they are both muscular and tall and were body guards for cocky smaller more talented heel wrestlers.

 

Nash though has the personality so far but we havent seen much of Andrews yet to really compare.

 

And if anything Andrews is probuably going to end up being the man who takes over the billing as the best tall wrestler after Kane and Undertaker step down which by then he should have learnt enough to and be good enough to try to fill the void left by those two which will be pretty big.

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I don't even think they ever intended it to be a 'wrestling match'. It was billed as a fight from the get go, and I doubt Bret would want to apply armbars and hip tosses.

 

On the Nash front, I've seen a few of his shoots and I could listen to him for days on end talking about wrestling and life in general.

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I personally don't "get" the love for Nash. He has been a useless article for well over a decade. All he does is come out with some funny lines now and again.

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Bret Hart was a pro-wrestler who could have a very good match with absolutely anyone. Bret Hart stopped being a pro-wrestler in January 2000. Any work since then can't be judged at all on the same scale. He shouldn't be in the ring at all, that's WWE's mistake.

 

Judging Jackson Andrews against Kevin Nash at this stage is utterly futile. For his first few months in the WWF, Nash was a charisma-less mysterious giant. That role doesn't suffice these days. Everyone knows too much and is too bloody cynical to give anything a chance. Andrews has already taken a beating, something that Diesel rarely did so the booking of him isn't up to much.

 

My views on Kevin Nash have been aired plenty on here. We talked a while back about history been kind to people. It hasn't just been kind to Kevin Nash, it's given him a blow-job and an MBE.

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Nash is quite a intelligent man as hes survived around wrestling for as long as he had, he knows his strengths and plays to them, mainly using his brain in the ring and backstage.

 

Exactly. He isn't a great worker but he knows what to do and when and in his prime (and select matches since) has been able to work that formula into some very good to great matches against some very good to great opponents. When he was motivated enough he could make it work against average opponents as well (which to me at least means he was "the shits"). That said, I do think he's basically a guy with a four year prime who would probably average one/a couple of good showing(s) a year afterwards (I may be wrong on that since I haven't seen much TNA post-2008 just going on his career 1999-2007) - maybe he'd have worked better in the territories when he could move on after a month or so?

 

For the record, I hated most of Nash's actual matches in Russo era WCW. He was easily one of my least favourite guys to watch in that 'just walk around the ring slowly' time. It's just some people seem to think he worked like that his entire career whereas I don't think he did. The matches with Sid from WWF in '95 and then in WCW around five years later are like night and day, not in terms of quality as much as in terms of how motivated Nash looked during his WWF Title run you really got the impression he was trying to make the matches work. Whether he was a good enough wrestler to pull it off or not is a different matter but he did look like he was trying. Half a decade later you got the impression he had 'done a Sting' and just wasn't bothered anymore or worse was actually trying to make the matches suck (most famously accused of sandbagging the match with Hogan, etc.).

 

I personally don't "get" the love for Nash. He has been a useless article for well over a decade. All he does is come out with some funny lines now and again.

 

Yeah, that's what I meant about being a bit puzzled by some of the praise this last half decade. I'm sure I've seen him listed amongst the best big man-style workers and best promos ever whereas for me he's nowhere near either.

 

Judging Jackson Andrews against Kevin Nash at this stage is utterly futile. For his first few months in the WWF, Nash was a charisma-less mysterious giant. That role doesn't suffice these days. Everyone knows too much and is too bloody cynical to give anything a chance. Andrews has already taken a beating, something that Diesel rarely did so the booking of him isn't up to much.

 

That is very true. Look at someone like Matt Morgan. Again I haven't seen enough of his TNA work to judge, but he's someone who looked to have the world of potential in OVW then got called up to the main roster and people were writing him off as being "boring" within what two weeks?

 

I forget who said it but I remember reading how he was the only person in that Rumble Benoit won not to get a reaction - which was true but you've got to give someone a chance. Instead some online fans had already determined he had "no charisma" and 'wasn't cut out for the big time'/only worked in OVW and he was popping up in "Who would you release"-type threads when it seemed he'd only been there for a cup of coffee. A year or so later, after another run too short to really make an impact (this time in the aforementioned "mysterious bodyguard gimmick") he was released.

 

I actually think WWE is been pretty bad as far as booking big men goes these days, especially for what used to be considered the Big Man territory in the 60s-early 90s. You look at guys like Tomko, Mike Knox and Luke Gallows - all big men, all of whom I rate as workers and all released within the last year (in Tomko's case without even getting back on TV). Twenty years ago there is no chance that Shad would have been the one released out of Cryme Tyme.

 

I'm not saying its entirely a negative thing (JTG is better) if it means we get more matches between people the caliber of Mysterio, Punk, Bryan, etc. who wouldn't have gotten a fair shake of the stick in 1990 - or even let in the wrestlers entrance, most likely - but it does seem they give up on the big guys easier. It's like they think "Hey he's tall have him squash a bunch of jobbers and it will automatically get over" then if/when it doesn't they scale down the push and they become a generic wrestler with no direction trading wins and losses on the undercard until someone on creative puts their hand up and suggests they give them another push (which is identical the first one, natch) six months to a year later then when that doesn't work they fire them. The exceptions to that rule seem to be down to luck more than ability - Kozlov looked like he was going the same way until he landed that team with Santino.

Edited by TheBigBoot

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