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How do UK wrestlers view the brit scene?


Jetta's G-string

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Depends who you ask, I suppose. I'm say someone like Johnny Moss will have a different outlook than Johnny Kickpads.

 

It's really not as clear cut as that because there's a ton of spastics about.

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It's a hobby unless you can live off the money.

To be fair, this is probably the best way to sum it up. Albeit a paying hobby.

 

Anyone who takes that attitude is making a vital error. Arch has not read the question correctly, we're not debating weather we are "professionals" or not. The question is how do we, view the British scene. To me, I approach it as a job, ie professionally, and a job which I highly enjoy doing and improving at. I (like those with self respect) am being paid to entertain fans, if I approached this as a hobby, it implies it is something which I enjoy doing weather I am good or not, and when you've got people who are fans paying to see this, it is a bad combination.

 

While I may not be a professional in the sense of only making a living from the business, I am acting like a professional, because their are still people forking over hard earned money to see myself and the others boys on the show, and you should always dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

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It's a hobby unless you can live off the money.

To be fair, this is probably the best way to sum it up. Albeit a paying hobby.

 

Anyone who takes that attitude is making a vital error. Arch has not read the question correctly, we're not debating weather we are "professionals" or not. The question is how do we, view the British scene. To me, I approach it as a job, ie professionally, and a job which I highly enjoy doing and improving at. I (like those with self respect) am being paid to entertain fans, if I approached this as a hobby, it implies it is something which I enjoy doing weather I am good or not, and when you've got people who are fans paying to see this, it is a bad combination.

 

While I may not be a professional in the sense of only making a living from the business, I am acting like a professional, because their are still people forking over hard earned money to see myself and the others boys on the show, and you should always dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

I read the question just fine, thanks. Just because something is a hobby doesn't mean you don't take it seriously. Lots of people have competitive sporting hobbies that they take very seriously. Of course you should always act professionally when working as a wrestler, but it's still your hobby if it's not something you do full time or make a living from.

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Exactly. Such applies with AmDram (amateur dramatics) as well. People will pay to see the plays, but just because it's not a decent income (well not an income at all if proper AmDram) it doesn't mean the players don't put everything and more into it as if it were their main career. I can see what he was trying to say though.

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As long as you're getting paid to do it, it's a job. And people say about British wrestlers "ah yeah but they don't get paid enough to call it a job". That's a lie (at my promotion anyway), they just don't get paid enough, unfortunately, to call it a full time job.

 

I'm not going to say what my guys get paid, and I don't know what other promoters pay. But I ask my guys to be at a show an hour before doors open, and they leave an hour after the show ends. Thats 4.5 hours, mulitiply that by

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As long as you're getting paid to do it, it's a job. And people say about British wrestlers "ah yeah but they don't get paid enough to call it a job". That's a lie (at my promotion anyway), they just don't get paid enough, unfortunately, to call it a full time job.

 

I'm not going to say what my guys get paid, and I don't know what other promoters pay. But I ask my guys to be at a show an hour before doors open, and they leave an hour after the show ends. Thats 4.5 hours, mulitiply that by

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It's a hobby unless you can live off the money.

To be fair, this is probably the best way to sum it up. Albeit a paying hobby.

 

Anyone who takes that attitude is making a vital error. Arch has not read the question correctly, we're not debating weather we are "professionals" or not. The question is how do we, view the British scene. To me, I approach it as a job, ie professionally, and a job which I highly enjoy doing and improving at. I (like those with self respect) am being paid to entertain fans, if I approached this as a hobby, it implies it is something which I enjoy doing weather I am good or not, and when you've got people who are fans paying to see this, it is a bad combination.

 

While I may not be a professional in the sense of only making a living from the business, I am acting like a professional, because their are still people forking over hard earned money to see myself and the others boys on the show, and you should always dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

I read the question just fine, thanks. Just because something is a hobby doesn't mean you don't take it seriously. Lots of people have competitive sporting hobbies that they take very seriously. Of course you should always act professionally when working as a wrestler, but it's still your hobby if it's not something you do full time or make a living from.

 

You've likely misinterpreted the question then, the OP states either a) job or b) hobby, not a "competitive sporting hobby", whatever such is.

 

Hobby: An activity or interest pursued outside one's regular occupation and engaged in primarily for pleasure.

 

Maybe it's just me, but I prescribe to the mentality of treat it like a job, do it professionally and improve.

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As long as you're getting paid to do it, it's a job. And people say about British wrestlers "ah yeah but they don't get paid enough to call it a job". That's a lie (at my promotion anyway), they just don't get paid enough, unfortunately, to call it a full time job.

 

I'm not going to say what my guys get paid, and I don't know what other promoters pay. But I ask my guys to be at a show an hour before doors open, and they leave an hour after the show ends. Thats 4.5 hours, mulitiply that by

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You've likely misinterpreted the question then, the OP states either a) job or b) hobby, not a "competitive sporting hobby", whatever such is.

 

I can't believe you don't know what I meant by that.

 

The other way I look at it is in the perspective of sunday league football etc. A lot of guy play that and don't get paid because football is their hobby, and if they're good they'll eventually hope to get spotted.

 

Mr Ravenhill understands.

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