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Teaching English abroad


Sphinx

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I've just been reading up on people teaching English in China and it got me wondering whether it's worth a shot. I like travelling, feel fairly confident with my English, am patient and could do with something that could give me better career prospects. At the moment, it's just that I fancy the idea and that it seems ideal and I realise I'd have to read into it more first. One problem is that I don't have a degree, and it seems like there are less legal opportunities to teach abroad without a degree.So has anyone on here taught abroad? Has it helped in the long run? How was it?

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I can understand needing something to show you're competent, but it seems odd that you could have a degree in Architecture and use that as your qualification to teach English abroad. I dare say an A level (or even a high grade GCSE) in English would be better than what they get over there at the moment.Maybe I should hurry up making my mind up on which degree to go for.

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I have to say, as a university lecturer I can understand why an 'A' Level isn't enough to get in. I don't know if it's because of the target-driven business of A levels leading to teachers pushing students through college by 'teaching the exams', but the standard of written English in some of the students we get these days really is fucking shocking. I've marked more than one undergrad paper in the last few years in which particular words were spelled in txt spk, and I'd say the majority of first year students I encounter don't know the difference between 'loose' and 'lose'. So yeah, I can see why they want a bit more assurance that the person they're going to be employing to teach the English language does actually understand that language. An 'A' Level is really no guarantee of that right now.

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Yeah, that's fair enough. It sounds like it'd still be an improvement on what they get over there already, but certainly not for the amount of money they're willing to pay. Some pay 4 times what another teacher at the school earns, which is also more than most of the parents earn.I know a lot of people who are doing English at university who still makes lots of basic mistakes too. I guess they probably make up for it in their ability to analyse or something.

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I have been in China for the last three years (not remotely related to teaching). I have lost count of the underqualified, under the influence, complete ketamine heads that have rocked up here and found a job teaching. Not even with a degree.If you actually do make a good teacher though then China would be rewarding. Brainwashed canvas to start on.If you ever make it China drop me a PM.Quick edit - As long as you steer clear of Shanghai and Beijing for teaching work.

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I am in China teaching now, I have been here for just under 15 months, I originally came here to study wushu but after that wanted to stay because, well England is a bit shit these days. I have no degree but found work, my first job was pretty shit, due to no degree and no experience I was paid way less then most foreigners and was also lied to and often the victim of racism. It was also clear due to the lack of teaching materials I was hired as a white face more than anything. After a few months I left and found a really good job at a private school. They cared less about me having a degree and more on wheather I could teach or not so I had to do a couple of demo classes. Once they saw I was ok they offered me a decent contract. Since then I have done really well. I hate to blow my own horn but I have won 2 teaching awards and been sent to Shanghai for an academic management course. I will be promoted to senior teacher when I sign a new contract this summer.So really the degree thing means fuck all when it comes down to being a good teacher, I know teachers with degrees who are shit and treat teaching as a joke. It tends to be the general feeling in my city that foreigners are here to teach English half arsed and fuck as many chinese girls as possible. Which is why I've found most of the foreigners here to be complete pricks. The degree is most important for the work visa but China is so big different provinces have different rules and if you get in a school or private company they normally have contacts in the visa office and can call on favours. The whole "you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours" notion works very well in China.I would recommend coming here for sure, be best if you do the TEFL course as that will help you, it is looked upon as being a good thing to have. If you need anymore info just say.

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Not wanting to hijack the thread, but has anyone got any experience teaching TEFL somewhere other than the far east? I'm also looking at getting into it (have degree, MA and 7 years university lecturing experience, saving to do TEFL course this summer or next). I know that seems to be where a lot of the work is these days, but I would prefer Eastern Europe or Spain. Is there much work going in that area these days, and how easy is it to get in?

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