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The Great Internet Black Out


patiirc

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Brief BBC overview of the situation

 

 

Edit: Basically if there is anything illegal on the sites that you visit, whether through association or hosted or direct linking. The sites will be suspended, shutdown or DNS blocked

 

This would be problematic for the likes of Ebay and so on because in practice mean that one item was pulled it would be the whole site that was pulled, if taken literally. :/

 

It also bans any sites promoting work arounds to any blocks put on it.

 

It doesnt stop there, any sites accused of illegality, whether actual or not will also be stricken from the record. Youtube, Wikipedia and various others would be subject to all kinds of needless shite

 

Message Board's like this could also suffer. Link to Daily Motion to watch some wrestling, thats illegal, good bye site!

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Basically, the corporations with the money are going to get power over the Internet and be able to shut down websites on a whim. It's not that simple, but it's not far from the truth.

 

Someone made a quote, an although I can't remember who or what the quote was verbatim, it goes a little something like this:

 

Imagine a 60-year-old or your grandparents being put in charge of the Internet. That's what's happening right now.
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Basically, the corporations with the money are going to get power over the Internet and be able to shut down websites on a whim. It's not that simple, but it's not far from the truth.

 

Someone made a quote, an although I can't remember who or what the quote was verbatim, it goes a little something like this:

 

Imagine a 60-year-old or your grandparents being put in charge of the Internet. That's what's happening right now.

 

That's based on the point that the average US congress member is 62.

 

It's not just a case of sites being shut down though. The main point is that even in cases where the allegedly offending site is outside of US jurisdiction, a court can make an order for a US based third party to take action that restricts it.

 

For example, let's say that Ian's made a blunder and, for just one of the pictures on his Davey Boy Smith appreciation thread, has forgotten to get the formal permission of the rightsholder to reproduce it. (Hypothetical example, obv.)

 

As UKFF is (presumably) based outside the UK, the yanks can't touch us. However, as SOPA is written, the rightsholder could got to a US court. That court can immediately order Google to stop listing UKFF in search results, PayPal to stop processing donations, and all US ISPs to block access. If we had, say Google advertising on here, the court could immediately bar all the ads. We'd probably survive (though TigerRick would have to take paid member cheques down the bank during his lunchtime), but many sites would instantly be crippled.

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For one it is absolutely ridiculous that they even want to go forward with it. They had their chance to nip this in the bud years ago when broadband was in its infancy and piracy was on a lower scale, instead they chose to line their own pockets from the .com boom and then cry foul and stomp all over it once it's in full swing.

 

Instead of adapting, they chose the route of ignorance and that's what everyone who enjoys using the internet should do to them.

 

Even if it did happen to be inforced, do you think that people would just take it? I think the backlash and resulting revolt would be enough to overturn it very quickly.

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