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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/22/2017 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Congratulations Ladiesman!! First poster to hit the -100 rep mark, much faster than I thought would happen. Apparently everyone thinks you're awful - have a month off.
  2. 8 points
    Right, here’s my what happens now guide from 2015 with some updates/rewrites. *** As we've got a few first-time voters (and maybe even first-time election viewers) here, I thought I'd cobble together a guide to the next couple of days: Election Day: You can vote between 7am and 10pm. If you've got a polling card in the post, it will tell you where to vote (you have to do it at a specific "polling station" near your home.) If you haven't got a card or aren't sure, you can find out from your Electoral Registration Office -- check for details at https://www.gov.uk/get-on-electoral-register. You don't need your polling card to vote, but having it saves time. Either way, all you actually need is to give your name and address. If you don't have a polling card, ID of some kind isn't necessary but may be useful. The exception is Northern Ireland where you need photo ID such as passport or driving license. (You can get a dedicated ID card for voting there as well, but it takes 10 days to get.) On your way into the polling station, people outside the building may ask for your polling card number. You don't have to give it. These are political party workers with no authority over you. The reason they ask is to check who has and hasn't voted and then chase up people who've previously said they'll support them. When you vote, the standard method is to put a cross in the box of the candidate you support. If you're feeling creative, you can do whatever you like but remember the key rule (as I understand it): you must clearly indicate one candidate, and one candidate only. If you feel like drawing a spunking cock, make sure that the shaft and balls are outside of any box and that the spunk drops are in one box only. If your ballot paper appears to either indicate nobody at all, or indicate more than one person, it's counted as an invalid vote. The number of invalid votes is announced for each seat, but isn't part of any official total or any national vote figures. There's no official distinguishment between 'spoilt' ballots (where people deliberately don't cast a valid vote) and those where people just screw it up. If you sign your ballot paper or write anything that identifies you, it's classed as an invalid vote. The ballot paper has a number on it, and the election staff make a note of the number on the paper they issue you. Technically that means somebody could trace how you voted. Officially that never happens and it's only done so people can check for bogus ballot papers (eg same number appearing multiple times). Unofficially even the worst conspiracy theory is that MI5 used to try to find out who'd voted Communist. If you mess it up or have a last second change of mind, you can ask to have the ballot paper destroyed and get a new one. Once you've actually put it in the ballot box, it's too late to change. When you leave the polling station, there's a possibility you'll be asked to take part in an exit poll organised by the media. This does not involve saying who you voted for, but instead secretly filling in an identical ballot and putting it in a box. If you agree to take part in this, you're being a bit of a dick if you don't 'vote' the same way as you did in reality. If you have a ballot paper in hand and are still waiting to get into the booth and cast it at 10pm, you can definitely still vote. If you are in the queue waiting to get a ballot paper at 10pm you are legally allowed to vote, but it might be a hassle if the staff aren't aware the law changed in 2013. Election Night: During the day, broadcast media are not allowed to report or discuss anything to do with party issues. Instead they solely report on the fact that people are voting. At 10pm when the polls close, the major broadcasters unveil the results of the exit poll. They don't give the voting figures but rather predict the number of seats, this time round for Conservative, Labour, Lib Dem, SNP, UKIP, Green and Plaid. Since 1992 the exit poll has generally been pretty accurate and the rule of thumb is that if nothing’s gone wrong, it should have the biggest party within 20 seats of the real result. How it works is in the spoiler tag below: The first actual results usually come a little before 11, usually Sunderland. That's partly because they have small, densely populated constituencies so don't have to move the ballot boxes as far, partly because they deliberately do a very efficient count to try to be first, and (unofficially) partly because everyone knows the Labour candidate will win by a mile so if they fuck up the count by a few votes here or there there's no chance of it mattering. The bulk of the results will be between 1 and 4am, a little earlier than usual this time as there are no council elections to delay things. One thing that's key to remember is that more of the early seats will likely be Labour as they are in cities where the constituencies are smaller and it's quicker to gather together the ballot boxes. Don't just look at Labour appearing to be way ahead and think they are "winning." Similarly, if you see a straightforward map of seats, don't be thrown by it being overwhelmingly blue for Conservative. That's because they tend to win more rural constituencies which tend to be much larger because they are sparsely populated. You'll be able to get a sense of who is winning based on which seats change hands and how much "swing" there is (change compared to the last election), but it's likely to be quite messy and inconsistent. Somewhere between 1 and 2, the people who do the exit poll will have enough real results to compare it to and will – if necessary – revise their forecast. At some point, most likely in the 3-4am region, the broadcasters stop quoting the exit poll and instead make individual predictions of the final figures based on the actual results that have come through so far. There may be a little variation between the channels, but really these projections should be close to bang on. What’s The Result Going To Be/What Do The Polls Say: Well. Recent polls have anything between Conservatives 1 and 11 percentage points ahead, which likely covers everything from a hung parliament to a landslide win. The actual results each polling company is getting – in other words what 1-2,000 people selected to represent the country as a whole (eg right balance of men/women, old/young, rich/poor, white/non-white etc) tell you – are generally the same: only a few more people saying Labour than Conservative. The differences are down to how they adjust the figures to account for the fact that different age groups are more or less likely to vote, which has an impact as young people are much more likely to support Labour and old people much more likely to support the Tories. There’s also the problem that people who agree to take part in polls are not normal and are more likely to be interested in politics, which usually means more likely to support Labour. In effect: If you simply assume everyone is telling the truth and the general public will turnout in the same way, it’ll likely be a hung parliament with the Conservatives ahead, largely because Labour are less efficient at turning votes into seats (lots of ‘wasted’ votes from having massive majorities in cities and – since 2015 – getting high vote counts when coming 2nd in Scottish seats.) This pretty much assumes Corbyn has done an amazing job of getting young people to actually vote (like 70-80% turnout.) If you adjust based on the idea young people will be somewhat inspired and thus vote at a similar rate to the EU referendum and in some past elections (60% or so), the polls suggest a similar Conservative lead to 2015, but this time that would be more like a majority in the 30-50 range (because of complex maths resulting from the smaller parties are doing so badly. If you adjust based on the idea young people turnout at the same rate as last time (43%), you’re looking at a 9-10 point lead and a massive majority. After The Results: So in 2015, this was a long piece about the hung parliament procedure, which is unlikely but impossible to be an issue this time. Anyhow, the key points to remember are that: * Neither the public nor MPs elect the government. * The timetable and process for one government being replaced by another is not inherently tied to general elections. Theresa May is Prime Minister (and thus appoints all government positions) and remains so until she resigns. That happens in three main ways: * She decides to go for non-election related reasons (like Thatcher, Blair and Cameron did.) * She concludes she has lost her ability to command the confidence of the House of Commons. * She actually loses a confidence vote in the Commons. When she resigns, the Queen invites the person best placed to command the confidence of the Commons. In the first scenario that's usually the new leader of the party. In the second and third cases, it's usually the leader of the opposition. None of this has anything to do with "winning" the election, whether that be most votes or seats or whatever. In 'normal' elections where one party wins a majority, it's straightforward. The governing party wins and the government continues in office; or the main opposition party wins, in which case it's obvious the PM has lost the confidence of the commons and she resigns almost immediately. If May wins she might go and say hi to the Queen, but there's no need to do so because it's just treated as the same government continuing. In a hung parliament (no party gets a majority of seats) it's less clearcut. Because it's all based on principles and precendence rather than a written constitution, there's a lot of debate about which of three thresholds would/should trigger a resignation: * May has clearly lost the ability to win a confidence vote. (Eg Labour & SNP have more than half the seats and both say they'll vote against May.) * May has clearly lost the ability to win a confidence vote and there's a clear alternative in the wider sense -- ie, Corbyn says he's ready to form a government of some form. * May has clearly lost the ability to win a confidence vote and there's a clear alternative in the narrower sense of Corbyn being able to *prove* he could win a confidence vote himself (which might require the specific approval of the SNP.) Chances are Labour would push for the first, the Conservatives demanding the third, and the actual correct position is the second. Corbyn doesn't necessarily have to win a vote in the Commons before being appointed PM. Last time I had a series of predictions/assessments of what would trigger what result. This time round everyone’s made clear that there’ll be no formal deals such as coalition (where two parties form a government) or confidence and supply (where one party forms a government and another party or parties agree not to vote against them in a no-confidence motion or budget vote, so they’ll definitely stay in power.) Remember that whoever forms a government very quickly has to pass a Queen’s Speech, which is just a list of the laws you want to bring in, but effectively acts as an initial confidence vote to “prove” the government is viable. Most likely then, the outcomes of a hung parliament would be: Conservatives on 308ish to 325: May stays as PM and runs a minority government because between Ulster Unionist support, Sinn Fein not taking seats and the Speaker/deputies not voting, she wouldn’t lose a confidence vote. Conservatives below 308 but clearly ahead of Labour: Conservatives stay as minority government because it wouldn’t be politically plausible for Corbyn to take over. Conservatives a little ahead but Labour + SNP add up to 325: Corbyn forms government after the SNP agrees to vote for its Queens Speech, possibly with an informal deal to be softer on Brexit and maybe even allow a second referendum. Right wing press goes apeshit. Labour ahead of Conservatives: Corbyn takes over and forms minority government. The Next Election [Yeah, this section didn’t age well. Turns out that though there’s a Fixed Term Parliament Act, the PM can call an election at any time and the opposition have to allow it or they look like pussies. FWIW, the Tories says they’ll repeal the act if they win.]
  3. 8 points
    Anyone remember 1996 when the Arndale got bombed and we immediately deported all the Irish people, then did air raids on Dublin?
  4. 7 points
    Ah, the life of a wrestling fan
  5. 6 points
    Someone came up to me off the street yesterday with tears in their eyes and said "Gus, you're the best there is, was, and ever will be. I got into the public affairs business because I watched you write a briefing for mid-level managers about the results of the local elections way back when". I just nodded, smiled and gave him my sunglasses before heading back to my hotel room which was choc-full of beautiful women.
  6. 6 points
  7. 5 points
    I'm weirdly at a state where I feel confident in how I look, even with acne problems still affecting my chest/back area (not even Hinder Jinder reasons) and a bit of worry that I'm quite small and slight compared to seemingly everyone who goes out drinking (5'8" and 11 stone makes me look tiny next to most people) but I dunno, I spent so many years worrying what people thought and that I dressed too weirdly or acted strange but at this point I feel better than I ever have done when I look in a mirror. For the purposes of anyone who asks, the trophy is me getting an award for the impact I've made on my Students Union for the work I do on the educational side of people's degrees and how I've tried to help people with their University life. Those on here who live in or around Bath Spa know we're a very creative and outgoing University and I'm super proud to be closing in on being an actual alumni after I finish my Masters and try and find a full time job (perhaps with my current one in the SU)
  8. 5 points
    Are you struggling to keep up with all these rumours concerning which forwards will move and who they will sign with? Me too, it's a right chore. Luckily I found this secret document on the dark web that tells us exactly who will be signing who, in the form of a children's puzzle. Simply follow the lines to see where the strikers will end up come 1st September.
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
    Ah. Three hours sleep and a massive hangover. Genuinely one of the best nights of my life. I can't begin to explain how appalling our MP has been the last two years and I am a saddo who adores my home city. It's not an automatic hatred of Conservatives either, the MP was just fucking horrific. I don't know what happens tomorrow and don't care. I just know my city has a really good person as MP and that's something to get a bit teary about in my slightly damaged state.
  11. 5 points
    *looks at exit polls* Well...sleep is a bit overrated anyway eh? Seriously if the exit polls are even close to being right, this is better than I hoped for. May's head must roll after this, she's fucked this right up. Imagine if they end up with fewer seats as projected! Ha! "Let's call a General Election now while Labour are fucked and Lib Dem are still 6ft under! Increase MY majority and five years for ME! Mwahaha!". Fucking poundshop Thatcher, have some of that.
  12. 5 points
    I assume she means It's time for a change, they can come and take their best shot. She tried to be a nice guy, she tried to play by the rules...
  13. 5 points
  14. 5 points
    I'm sorry to hear that it didn't last too long.
  15. 4 points
    I don't think any main event on Nitro qualifies for this thread, as they were all billed as the biggest night in the history of our sport. Can't say fairer than that.
  16. 4 points
    Been a while since I posted on here, but I lurk most days. Yeah, I work out now! That transformation happened over a number of years. I have a few of you on Facebook that have probably seen the journey happen as it unfolded.
  17. 4 points
    Look, I've been clear, what I'm really interested in seeing is the government getting on with the job of governing: in Brexit negotiations but also tacking things like the housing shortage, mental health and technical education for our young people.
  18. 4 points
    In for an all nighter as I'm off work all week
  19. 4 points
    Any optimism I have for the election usually dissipates as soon as Diane Abbott is let loose on telly.
  20. 4 points
    Turns out it may just have been someone with the same unusual name. Not quite, but I've been on a journey. Up to and including 2010 I was a firm Conservative voter. I didn't believe in New Labour at all and could not stand our sitting Labour MP after my beloved Jerry Hayes was knocked out in the Blair Massacre of 1997. I didn't disagree entirely with the concept of austerity, but they lost me when they started closing libraries. Whilst I do agree with principles such as standing on your own two feet and all that jazz, where possible, you have to provide people with some kind of chance to do that. If people don't take the chances open to them then I am less charitable, but you have to take the horse to the water or at least let the horse know where the water is. You can't hide all the water in offshore accounts and leave the horse in a ravine. I abhor those that pull the ladder up after themselves. In the run up to 2015 I remained unconvinced by Labour and austerity-lite and instead found some of the Greens more radical thinking interesting and our local Conservative MP is a disabled bloke who votes against money for the disabled, votes against gay rights, and knobs his mistress on expenses. Then Brexit happened. Call me cynical, but I reckon the Tories appear to be heading for a deliberate no-deal flounce out. There's no other reason for them selling the "no deal's better than a bad deal" line on loop for 6 months. That then gives them carte blanche to sell of anything and everything "in the national interest." It's going to be a "tough decision" to decide which minister gets to award their spouse/partner the fattest PFI deal. This obviously will all be fault of the boogeyman EU. As another vote for the Greens (Caroline <3) would do nothing but cement the incumbent Conservative MP's position I was prepared, as much as I detest tactical voting, to hold my nose and vote Labour. The hysterical slurs and attacks are nothing short of insane. New Labour reframed "the left" to such a ridiculous extent that anything left of centre-right is now the "loony left." Corbyn has done much to impress me with how he's handled that and has delivered something that could be workable if we weren't all such reactionary, greedy, selfish bastards. Without getting into the realms of hyperbole, in my lifetime I've never seen a mainstream political party lead by someone with such a just sense and who has consistently been ahead of the curve on the right side of history. Finally, there's the Theresa May factor. As a Christian there is no way that I can support a party lead by her. I won't support someone who chooses to wrap themselves in the veneer of respectability that being a vicar's daughter affords them as they give the poor and vulnerable another shellacking whilst cowing to despots as they buy our arms. So I won't be going in on Thursday with a peg on my nose. Instead I'll be proudly voting for the party lead by Jezza and praying that even if isn't #jc4pm it's a reduced majority for Mother Theresa and a more robust opposition from Mr JC. Vote Labour (two words I never thought I'd put down next to each other).
  21. 4 points
    Say it. Say you'll kill millions of people. Go on. Say you'll make swathes of the planet uninhabitable. Come on you massive pussy why won't you satisfy my bloodlust rage erection. Have a fucking word with yourselves.
  22. 4 points
    Finally nabbed a full time, permanent job starting Monday, but I'm bricking it. I know I can do the job and do it well but my anxiety is off the scale. I know that within one hour of being there I'll be fine and will feel like I can get my life back on track but for some reason I'm shitting it.
  23. 4 points
    We climbed Currahee Mountain yesterday as featured in Band of Brothers. It was hard going considering the heat and incline but the views were incredible. So proud to have walked in the footsteps of legends and on Memorial Day too. This is me at the top and one from the bottom to show the elevation.
  24. 4 points
    As a filthy pig, can I just put out from the majority of my colleagues that were scattered across the country, myself knocking about Stratford, over the last couple of days. A massive thank you to anyone that took the time to talk to us or asked if we needed owt. We were looked after by the people we were looking after, and it was a wonderful experience to be a part of from the most horrible of circumstances.
  25. 4 points
    I was blaring out some Little Richard on my way home yesterday. Is that acceptable?
  26. 4 points
    I think the term is bellend.
  27. 4 points
    No, it is in our blood so to speak. A lot of Punjab is agricultural land so I'm sure part of it is evolutionary and the rest is probably hereditary. Tracing back geanology/DNA, most Punjabis have a different heritage to the rest of India, mainly Portuguese and Greek or so I understand. Probably some natural selection by the path the religion had taken too. On my trips to Punjab I've been to historic gurdwaras that hold weapons used by Sikhs in 1500/1600s and to say they were big would be any understatement, I struggled to see how a normal sized human could use such a thing. There have been many civil wars Sikhs have been involved in so I'm assuming those who couldn't fight or were smaller were the ones whose lineage died out.
  28. 4 points
    It's worth mentioning, too, that the first British troops deployed anywhere in World War 1 were in Iraq, and that Kaiser Wilhelm purposefully stirred up long-dormant Islamic notions of Jihad and, through Max von Oppenheim, made a concerted effort to stir up anti-British and anti-American sentiment amongst the Islamic world, engendering a strain of radical Islam in the process. The notion that Western interference with the Islamic world is a recent phenomenon is quite clearly nonsense. In terms of the rise of extremist Islamic terrorism, the West absolutely have blood on their hands. That doesn't excuse the actions of terrorists targeting innocent people in the name of Islam by any measure, but it's burying our heads in the sand to not look into why people would do such things. That said, in this instance, in the Westminster attack, and in instances in France and Belgium, the perpetrators have been born in the countries that they have targeted, they have been second or third generation, not recent immigrants. So can we really place much of the blame on the politics of other countries, countries these people might have never even visited? So much of the rhetoric around these attacks focuses on immigration and the refugee crisis, but these are people who have grown up here, in this country, and are more radicalised, more extremist than their parents' generation. How do we solve that? I don't know the answer, obviously. But we're looking at someone being so alienated, pushed so far to the edge, that they'd be prepared to target a room full of innocent children and teenagers, and take their own lives in the process. We shouldn't be looking to this as analogous to the actions of IS in Middle Eastern warzones, but more as something akin to the actions of school shooters in the US. Someone born and raised in that community feeling so isolated from it, and so resentful and hateful of it, that they are driven to kill, for no personal gain. I'm as guilty as this of anyone, but we fall into problems when it comes to language and trying to talk about Islam - not, as so many insist, because of "political correctness" or some leftist agenda preventing us from talking about it, but because most of us don't know much about Islam. I'm not criticising you for using it, but I dislike the term "moderate Muslims". I think it has the opposite effect of what's intended - insisting on the qualifier "moderate" feels accusatory, almost as if we're implying that they're making an effort to temper the worst excesses of their faith, rather than just being ordinary people. Similarly, I don't like that we tend to conflate "extremist" with "fundamentalist", because it implies that the extremists are following a fundamental - i.e., more true, closer to the intended meaning - interpretation of Islam than the "moderates" which, again, suggests that the "moderates" are the outliers and, potentially, only a step or two away from becoming extremist. It might not sound important, or might sound like nit-picking, but I think the choice of language we use has a major impact on how we address issues like this. Even Wahhabism, from what I understand, is a bit of a linguistic minefield, with many Islamic scholars disagreeing on exactly what constitutes Wahhabism, and what it should be called. Though there's a school of thought that this was intentional, and that Wahhabist sects consciously created confusion between Wahhabism and Salafism because they recognised that the majority of the Muslim world would reject Wahhabism. I've seen it said, even, that Al Qaeda's branch of Islam had no grounding in Wahhabism, and that Bin Laden's "political Islam" should be seen as a different entity altogether - that Wahhabism was traditionally focused on reforming Islam, rather than converting or attacking its perceived enemies, and that the conventional Wahhabist view was that Jihad could only be called for by the ruler, not individuals. It may be more true to say that Bin Laden followed Sayyid Qutb's teachings, rather than Wahhabism, and that it was Qutb who inspired the political Jihadist branch of Islam that has since grown into the likes of IS. Though, saying that, IS do openly associate themselves with Wahhabism, so the distinction is never quite so clear. Ultimately, Wahhabism is a regressive doctrine tied intrinsically to the wealth and influence of the House of Saud - yet another reason to be endlessly frustrated by US and UK politicians hand-wringing about terrorism while doing big business with the chief exporters of the terrorists' doctrine for the past few decades - and riddled with hypocrisy (but, really, what religious doctrine isn't, somewhere along the line?). The basic doctrine underpinning Wahhabism is that "true" Islam is monotheistic, unquestioning of the word of Allah, and that any deviations from or innovations an alterations to the "first" Islamic doctrine is sin and un-Islamic, and so is any questioning of Wahhabist teachings. Again, it's far too complex an issue for any of us to pretend to understand what's really going on. Ultimately, they see all other branches of Islam (i.e. the vast majority of people practicing Islam since the 1700s) as heretics, and any pre-Islamic history as false - hence the justification for IS' destruction of ancient artwork and historical sites, which in actuality is mostly just an excuse for good old-fashioned black market trading. I've probably grossly misrepresented or misunderstood Wahhabism there, as - like I said - I don't really know all that much about Islam, and this speaks to the importance of keeping Muslims involved in the conversation about this sort of thing rather than trying to make sense of it all ourselves! I'm rambling all over the place, but the point is, the vast majority of people in "the West" don't know enough about Islam to know the distinctions between different sects or different approaches to the faith. I couldn't tell you off-hand the differences between Sunni and Shi'ite, which is really quite important! On one hand, this only engenders the distrust too many people feel towards all Muslims because they get tarred with the same brush, but on the other, it allows those of us on the other side of the political spectrum, by ignoring those same distinctions, to point out that more Muslims are victims of Islamic terrorism than perpetrators, and that you cannot blame Islam in its entirety when they are attacking Islamic sites and people, and hope that this very simple fact is enough to make people at least reconsider their kneejerk reactions.
  29. 4 points
    You're right Andy, it is no coincidence. And you're helping to continue the pattern. - Extremists commit atrocity in a Western country, and claim to do so in the name of Islam. - Non-Muslims in Western country take the claim at face value and blame all Muslims. - Muslims in Western country become marginalised, victimised, just for being Muslim. - Extremists reach out to these Muslims and tell them "See? Those people don't want you, they hate you, they're not your brothers. We're your brothers, we want you. Join us." - The most vulnerable, impressionable, and disenfranchised of these Muslims take the bait and become radicalised, growing the ranks of the extremists. - Extremists commit another atrocity in a Western country, claiming to do so in the name of Islam. Because it works. And will keep working while non-Muslims keep playing into their hands by perpetuating the divisive cycle of judging a whole religion just because these wankers tell you to.
  30. 3 points
    "It's a good thing you have a big willy or I fucking swear, you'd have been kicked out of this fucking house long ago!!!" : After herself slipped on her bum with a comically violent fall, because of a load of eggs I’d dropped out of the tray onto the floor, and only half arsedly cleaned them up. I wouldn’t mind, it’s not like I’m Lexington Steele or anything, so I’m just grateful that (a) she ‘s never asked ‘Are you in yet?’ and (b) her past conquests must have had little Halloween monkey nut willys.
  31. 3 points
    Overcast and dismal looking outside. Proper weather. British weather. God Saves the Queen rings off in the distance and not a sign of shorts when looking out into my grey, miserable kingdom. Stroik ah loight Mary Poppins, British summah iz back.
  32. 3 points
    All sorts of "how people voted" survey stats: https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/06/13/how-britain-voted-2017-general-election/ Most interesting being that based on surveys at the start of the campaign, 34 was the age where people were equally likely to vote Labour or Conservative, with younger people being more Labour and older people being more Conservative. By election day, that 'crossover' age had risen to 47. Also, social class no longer really plays much role at all, but education is a big factor: graduates much more Labour and people with GSCE level only much more Conservative. And most people with a job voted Labour (which, to be fair, has a clue in the name.)
  33. 3 points
    Yeah, Austin left for two weeks after Mania because he was pissed off with what was going on with the NWO and his own direction. I have a funny little story from that - at the time I had my own shitty little geocities website, no big deal. Just a 15 year old having fun writing about wrestling. A guy I'd known online for a couple of years, but dipped in and out of the chat services of the day (Yahoo Messenger, specifically) far less frequently in 2002, would talk to me about what was going on in the WWF, both big fans, of course. I had his name on the website here and there as he'd contributed interesting factoids about what was happening that I hadn't seen anywhere else on the net. Cool, I thought, he might be getting one of these newsletters I am hearing about a lot. I wrote on the site about Austin leaving for two weeks because he was frustrated about the booking and what was going on with the NWO. And this friend of mine went absolutely bonkers, telling me it wasn't true, he was gone for two weeks because he was burned out, needed to rest up, and was given time off. He added that I absolutely had to take his name off the website as long as that story was on it, and repeatedly stressed he had two weeks off because he was burned out. About three months later, he went back on this, and told me I was right. Years later, I discover that this gentlemen, who I think was named Cerith Roberts, was actually on the WWF creative team at the time of Austin's walkout, hence the aggro. Knocked me for six.
  34. 3 points
    I actually think Corbyn would be the perfect PM to be negotiating Brexit, because he's not a cunt. He wouldn't bring the arrogance to the table that May & the Tories did. So the EU top dogs would be far less spiteful in negotiations. The sheer arrogance of the pro-Brexit mouth-pieces after Brexit was mind boggling - intentionally trying to piss off someone you have 2 years of negotiations with ahead of you, and you hold a much worse hand. I'd bet my house on Corbyn cutting a better deal with the EU than May ever could.
  35. 3 points
  36. 3 points
  37. 3 points
    A few random responses to things posted here: I’ve not seen them because I have heavy filtering and aren’t in the target market, but apparently the Conservatives are spending a fortune on highly targeted Facebook video ads that are just a bunch of clips from Corbyn interviews taken out of context and stressing the whole security/terrorist issue. I did like the line someone gave that whatever Corbyn success there is comes because he held together a coalition of people who like him and don’t like the Labour party, and people who like the Labour party and don’t like him. Very anecdotal, but it does feel like a lot of “soft” Labour voters who might have been spooked by him and gone Tory have taken a look at the May campaign and said screw that. While I’m sure the Tories will win and likely increase their majority, it does look like a good shot they and UKIP combine to get less than 50 percent, so May’s going to have to be brazen to claim she has a mandate for hard/insane/no deal Brexit. Amber Rudd seems to be the best candidate for a high profile scalp, though that definitely seems to be in the “only if the huge youth turnout is real” territory. Both Angus Roberston and Nick Clegg could also be at risk. The massive youth registration figures could be misleading as a lot of it may be people knocked off the register because of changes (moving to or from university, or having individual rather than whole household registration) and not noticing until the election was called and then reregistering. On a practical point, the Tories really need a majority of 30-40 to be confident of getting the boundary changes through without relying on people voting to eliminate their own seat. Voting in a safe seat is always worth it, if only because it contributes to the argument for proportional representation. What happens to May is fascinating. On the one hand, you can definitely see how the Tories would want to dump her if she doesn’t get a meaningful increase in the majority. On the other hand, she’s still on course for the biggest Tory vote share and majority in a generation, and there’s something bizarre about the idea of somebody winning a general election and getting deposed. Plus you’d have an “unelected” PM, not to mention the Tories might well pick somebody who was as or more hardline on Brexit, despite that getting less than an overwhelming backing in the election. My own constituency is a straight Labour-Tory fight between the current MP and Jacob Rees Mogg’s niece. UKIP aren’t standing, the Greens have a weak candidate and some of their local members are openly running a “vote Labour this time only” campaign, while the free mailshot from the Lib Dem guy was literally the first time I knew his name. It’s the type of constituency that should be safe Labour but gets closer to a marginal if Labour are doing badly (It was only ever Conservative in 83 and 87.) Last time round was Labour 18,000, Conservative 14,000 and UKIP 7,000, so the UKIP absence is a big factor. The Tories very clearly thought this was winnable and they’ve sent Theresa May (see my previous posts), Boris Johnson (who was talking up whisky exports to India as the benefit of Brexit until somebody pointed out he was in a Sikh temple and the crowd weren’t really big making-money-from-alcohol fans) and Philip Hammond. I was worried it would go Tory at the start of the campaign, and some bookies still have them as favourite. However, with a closer race nationally I’m more confident that a combination of tactical voting and enough former UKIP voters “returning” to Labour or giving it a miss will be enough. (Disclaimer: I’m delivering some Labour leaflets in my street and helping out on polling day.) The other Bristol constituencies are one fairly safe Labour, one very safe Tory, and then one that’s effectively a four-way Labour/Green/Lib Dem/Tory marginal that is probably the best chance of the Greens picking up a second seat in the country. (I’ll repost my “What happens on election day” post tomorrow with the relevant updates/rewrites.)
  38. 3 points
    Peter Sallis has one of the greatest voices I've ever heard. A voice you cannot hear without smiling. Even on shit adverts.
  39. 3 points
    From a guy that used to work for the same company as me. Last year he bought a £2,000,000 house and has his'n'hers matching Ferraris with custom interiors. I'm not suggesting he meets the stereotype that those voting for the Tories are the ones with plenty money, but, y'know.....
  40. 3 points
    Plus he would actually win 50% of races this time around.
  41. 3 points
    I just reckon they should ban Scottish football.
  42. 3 points
    The unfancied red team from North London beat the bad guys in blue from West London today. Wouldn't mind a repeat on June 8th!
  43. 3 points
    Someone who has posted a few anti muslim posts in the past posted the "People don't think the KKK represent Christians" thing about ISIS, which was nice to see. A right racist actually linked a story from Pamela Geller and told me to "WAKE UP!!!!" and to go and live with the cunts if I wanted to after I pointed out to him the Manchester bomber was born in Manchester. He then posted some bizarre picture of a map of Europe highlighting Islamic attacks and the caption said something about Poland doesn't have any because it has a "No migrants" policy. So I pointed out that one of the Eastern Europeans he got pregnant lives in Poland with their son and linked him to a page showing how Poland doesn't have a "No Migrants" policy and how he could apply to live there (he is one of those who threatens to leave the UK because of all the immigrants) I'm now blocked.
  44. 3 points
    People congratulating LBC for binning her seem to be missing the point that they should never have employed the twat in the first place.
  45. 3 points
  46. 3 points
    To signal to us that he's more virtuous than the bilious, hateful bigots.
  47. 3 points
    Khali wasn't Sikh but he was Punjabi, the ancestral land of Sikhs. Sikhism is/was a martial religion so physically many Sikhs are well suited to combat sports, and combat in general. Sikhs are a minority in India but make up a huge number of the army, and thousands fought in World War 2. Wrestling was something that was actively encouraged by the Second Sikh Guru and there are many wrestling Akarahs (training schools) all over Punjab and in many Sikh gurdwaras in the UK and Canada.
  48. 3 points
    With the question of whether the two cultures are simply too different to coexist side by side, I totally get where you're coming from @AndyUK I've wondered that myself at times over the last ten or so years, and sometimes it does feel like it isn't possible. First things first though - yes, there are some big cultural differences. You shouldn't be made to feel like a bigot for recognising that. But if you want to make an argument from history, throughout history great things have happened from different cultures meeting and mixing. But that can only happen if the two actually mix! Like Zeb said, if we foster this us vs them mentality, we're only adding to the problem. On a purely practical level, "sending them all back" isn't possible. It just isn't. Muslim communities are embedded over generations here, and time and again these attacks are committed by people born in the countries where the attacks happen. Once you accept that, you have to be pragmatic and look for the solution. And dividing us can never be the solution. So I'd encourage you to start to try to find the similarities rather than focusing on the differences.
  49. 3 points
    I was at the vigil this evening, the best thing for me was nobody politicised it, despite political leaders being there. A woman in a hijab next to me was crying and strangers hugged her and told her she was as much a part of Manchester as they were. It was a real feeling of solidarity and community. I fucking love Manchester.
  50. 3 points
    3rd Circle line of Hell, surely?